Tips and tricks for improving your scicomm #3

Every Sunday over on my Instagram page, I share my weekly tips and tricks for improving your science communication. These can range from tips for public speaking, or using social media as a scientist to getting familiar with theories and evidence in the scicomm and public engagement space such as science capital.

Every so often I want to share a recap of those posts here on my blog so you never miss out on my advice and things I am learning myself as I navigate my way through a professional science communications career too.

So, here is the first Scicomm Sunday Highlights recapping edition 17 to the latest edition number 20.

You can find other Scicomm Sunday posts here:

1-1213-16

Scroll down to get your tips on storytelling, being accessible & more!

.

#17 – Flexing your storytelling skills

View this post on Instagram

SCICOMM SUNDAY #17 πŸ—£ Your weekly tips & tricks for improving your science communication! . This week I want to talk to you about… . FLEXING YOUR STORYTELLING SKILLS . In Edition #11, I shared with you a scicomm 101 starter toolkit πŸ› for those looking to get into scicomm or ways they could look into improving. For the next few editions I thought I would go a little more in depth. . Now you are probably thinking, what on earth does a story have to do with science. Well, when it comes to scicomm, we want to get our message across about the latest research or some fun facts to inspire the next generation. We are much more likely to remember some information if it is in a story that we can remember key things. . So I thought I would share a few things to start thinking about when it comes to your science stories: . PLOT – its got to go somewhere. How has it changed from when you start the story. This could be how you got the data from your experiment when giving a talk, or you could explore how a protein manages to do its job at an engagement event . CHARACTERS – who are the key players in your story? Is it scientists or is it proteins & cells. Dont be afraid to give them personalities to make your story more memorable . SETTING – letting your audience know where this is going on can give them a preconception about your story. That can help with a big reveal at the end.. . PROBLEM – a story has to have a dilemma. It has ups & downs to find a solution & its these journeys that we cling to with stories. It is what will make your story memorable . EMOTIONS – we are always more likely to remember something if we feel something, so make your audience feel something – happy, sad, angry, anything with what you're sharing . PERSPECTIVE – does your story change if it is told from a different angle? Does that enhance your story? Play around with this . Think about some of your favourite stories & think about these things when it comes to that story! Now apply that to your science. Share your characters, emotions & so on in the comments below. . What other scicomm tips do you want to see here on Scicomm Sunday? . . Edition 17, over and out! . πŸ’•

A post shared by πŸ”¬Dr Soph Arthur 🌻 | she/her (@soph.talks.science) on

.

#18 – Using accessible language & be inclusive

View this post on Instagram

SCICOMM SUNDAY #18 πŸ—£ Your weekly tips & tricks for improving your science communication! . This week I want to talk to you about… . USING ACCESSIBLE LANGUAGE & BE INCLUSIVE πŸ₯°πŸ₯° . In Edition #11, I shared with you a scicomm 101 starter toolkit πŸ› for those looking to get into scicomm or ways they could look into improving. For the next few editions I thought I would go a little more in depth. . Scicomm is about bringing the love of science to anyone and everyone. And that means EVERYONE! Science is often seen as an elitist pursuit, so we need to break down those barriers as more perspectives and experiences will help to advance scientific knowledge & research more! . So in the name of being accessible & inclusive, I thought I would share a list of things to think to think about when doing your science communication or organising an engagement event: . πŸ’¬ Avoid using jargon to describe your science πŸ“±Add alt text descriptions to social media posts πŸ“„ Add image/video/gif descriptions on social media posts 🎨 Consider what colours you are using in print and on slides β™Ώ Find ways to make your venue accessible for all πŸ’» Provide screen readers or magnifiers for events that may require it πŸ‘• Provide shirts of all sizes for volunteers πŸ‘«πŸ½ Make sure your events represent all genders, races, religions, backgrounds and scientific roles πŸ—£ Consider whether you need translators including sign language interpreters πŸ‘ΆπŸ» Make sure there are areas for mothers to feed potentially πŸŽ₯ Add captions to your videos and also closed captions on live videos . What other tips would you add to this list to make your scicomm more inclusive and accessible? Let's make a comprehensive list for all! . What other scicomm tips do you want to see here on Scicomm Sunday? . . Edition 18, over and out! . πŸ’•

A post shared by πŸ”¬Dr Soph Arthur 🌻 | she/her (@soph.talks.science) on

.

#19 – Practice, practice, practice, repeat

View this post on Instagram

SCICOMM SUNDAY #19 πŸ—£ Your weekly tips & tricks for improving your science communication! . This week I want to talk to you about… . PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE, REPEAT πŸ”„ . In Edition #11, I shared with you a scicomm 101 starter toolkit πŸ› for those looking to get into scicomm or ways they could look into improving. For the next few editions I thought I would go a little more in depth. . I get asked soooooo many times: "How do I get started in scicomm?" . The short answer is to practice πŸ”„ . If you want to write a blog, start one πŸ’» If you want to make videos, start a YouTube channel πŸŽ₯ If you want to run events, organise one πŸŽ‰ . Get involved and start. Noone expected you to be perfect the first time but you have to have a go to know how to improve. . That's why it's so important to measure different things and evaluate to assess YOUR success πŸ”„. Defining your "sucess" measures is crucial and also *hopefully* stops you comparing your growth and improvement to those around you. . You will make mistakes but you will also learn how to fix them and it will make your podcast, articles or videos better the next time around. ListenπŸ‘‚πŸΌ to feedback and most importantly listen to what your audience want so you can improve next time around. . Practice makes better after all! πŸ”„πŸ”„πŸ”„ . What mistakes have you made in scicomm? Let's share as we might be able to help others improve their scicomm too. . What other scicomm tips do you want to see here on Scicomm Sunday? . . Edition 19, over and out! . πŸ’•

A post shared by πŸ”¬Dr Soph Arthur 🌻 | she/her (@soph.talks.science) on

.

#20 – Listen and encourage conversation

View this post on Instagram

SCICOMM SUNDAY #20 πŸ—£ Your weekly tips & tricks for improving your science communication! . This week I want to talk to you about… . LISTEN AND ENCOURAGE CONVERSATION πŸ‘‚πŸΌ . In Edition #11, I shared with you a scicomm 101 starter toolkit πŸ› for those looking to get into scicomm or ways they could look into improving. For the next few editions I thought I would go a little more in depth. . One of the reasons most of us engage in science communication is to engage the public with their research, or maybe to share some new knowledge. . BUT no matter how good are you are at engaging the public, you are not going to get your messages across if you are not sharing information that the public are interested in. . It is so important to know what your audience want from you as a communicator. Listen to their questions and concerns and have those conversations with them that they want. . Moreover from this, for us to be able to fully embed communication and engagement within the research community and the public, we need to listen to our audiences and involve them with what research questions we are working to answer. It's our job as communicators to enable that connection between the public and researchers so we can all work towards breaking boundaries together. . So at the next time you do some scicomm or engagement of any kind, make sure to ask questions of your audience and more importantly listen to what they want to know. Pledge to do that with me. How are you going to do that? . What other scicomm tips do you want to see here on Scicomm Sunday? . . Edition 20, over and out! . πŸ’•

A post shared by πŸ”¬Dr Soph Arthur 🌻 | she/her (@soph.talks.science) on

.

Remember you can learn even more communication and engagement lessons and tips every Sunday over on my Instagram. Make sure to set up notifications so you don’t miss a post!

.

What scicomm tips and tricks so you want to learn about? Let me know in the comments below so you can get the info and advice you need to improve your scicomm!

.

If you enjoyed this post, then please hit like, write a comment or share it with your family and friends for them to discover the joys of science too. Or you could pin it using the graphic below. It would really mean so much to me. Or you can always subscribe to Soph talks science in the menu to never miss out on any science inspiration and curiosity ever again.

.

β™₯ I am absolutely thrilled to announce that I am a brand ambassador for Petite Ecoliere; a company with the wish to inspire a dedication to education of girls and women, and to give back to charities helping girls all around the world. Follow this link or click on the graphic below to find an awesome little something for you or someone you love and give back at the same time!

β™₯ Love what you see? Then don’t miss a blog post by signing up for email notifications!

β™₯ Have a question about this, working with me or anything else related to science? Contact me on FacebookTwitter or Instagram.

β™₯ I am a proud brand ambassador for Two Photon Art and CureGear. Go and treat yourself to a little something special.

2 thoughts on “Tips and tricks for improving your scicomm #3

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s